BIO2015 Idea Hack Recap

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The MIT Hacking Medicine team was at BIO2015 in Philadelphia to run a 4-hour, all hands on deck, action-filled Idea Hack last
Thursday, 18 June. We had a blast meeting all the participants and
getting the room to innovate solutions around three awesome
topic: personalized medicine, clinical trials, and patient engagement.
And yes, you heard me right — we held a 4-hour hackathon, and the ideas
were amazing!

Mike Spear from Genome Alberta caught up with our very own Ned
McCague and Chris Lee to give you a rundown of the controlled chaos:

If you wanted to see one of the most energetic
presentations at BIO 2015 in Philadelphia you needed to attend the Idea
Design Studio Hacking Medicine session put on by MIT. Ned McCague
(pictured below) led things off and continued to use his high energy
style to keep the attendees not only engaged, but also to help get them
actively involved and do some work…

Listen to the podcast here.

Mike Spear @ BIO2015

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At BIO 2015, Mike Spear from Genome Alberta caught up with our very own Ned
McCague and Chris Lee to give you a rundown of the controlled chaos:

If you wanted to see one of the most energetic
presentations at BIO 2015 in Philadelphia you needed to attend the Idea
Design Studio Hacking Medicine session put on by MIT. Ned McCague
(pictured below) led things off and continued to use his high energy
style to keep the attendees not only engaged, but also to help get them
actively involved and do some work…

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We know that telehealth can help get the elderly get more ready access to the care they need, but does it also increase costs? (via Online doctor visits can be easy, but Congress thinks they increase costs – The Washington Post)

Reflections from the Global Health Track of the Grand Hack!

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Developing solutions for global issues is difficult without cultural
context. The Grand Hack gave our team a chance to understand the
cultures we were designing for by bringing people with experiences and
expertise from all over the world, together. Our team’s goal was driven
by Lydia Asiimwe’s story and her near death experience from falling off a
Ugandan motorcycle taxi (boda-boda).

image

We took a user-centric design approach and started by trying to
understand everything we could about the people, environment,
transportation history, and the culture surrounding Uganda by
interviewing Lydia about her experience. This framework allowed us to
derive the following concept drivers: (1) women in Uganda are required
to sit side saddle as it is deemed inappropriate otherwise (2) they wear
long dresses with material that makes it very easy to slide off the
motorcycle with the slightest bump (3) When you are carrying anything,
you exponentially increase your chance of injury because you have to
hold on with one hand, or you are crowding the available space on the
motorcycle, decreasing the control the driver has. Our goal became “how
do we prevent injury and trauma for women who have to sit side straddle
on a boda-bodas in rural Uganda”.

image

Next, we started to dive deeper into the culture of the people as well
as that of boda-bodas to understand how we could approach solving the
problem. We moved from designing something that people could carry
around, approaches for manufacturers to make motorcycles safer, and
eventually decided that an accessory to current boda-bodas would be the
most sustainable and adoptable approach.

image

After understanding what type of materials and manufacturing techniques
were available in Uganda, we started to sketch and prototype around many
different ideas. We landed on the L shaped brace that attaches to the
sister bar (a common part on most motorcycles) that gives the side
saddle user comfort, storage space, and safety during their ride. This
same brace can also rotate into a second “mode” that allows for extra
storage space when there isn’t someone sitting side saddle.

image

The greatest success of our team is its diversity and experience. We are
composed of an Industrial Designer (Ayan Bhandari) Who brought
Ximedica’s user-centric design approach, a Biomedical Engineer (Blesson
John) who works in Global Health, a public health specialist (Anu
Mather) that has worked with implementing programs in different
cultures, and a user (Lydia Asiimwe) who has experienced every detail of
the problem we were trying to solve. We believe that “Good design is not about what you can do, it’s about what you should do”
and we continue to work on Nyweza (Ugandan for “hold on tight”) to
create a prototype that we can get onto boda-bodas in Uganda in the near
future.

image

Health Hackathon Winners Provide A Window Into The Future Of Healthcare

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A mobile app that guides sonographers towards ideal ultrasound probe positioning [1], and an easy-to-install device that enhances safety for the predominantly women passengers of motorcycles in low and middle-income countries [2]. These were just some of the innovative solutions that surfaced from the Grand Hack health hackathon, where participants worked on healthcare challenges within one of four tracks: global health, primary care, telehealth enabled care pathways, and wearables.

Organized by MIT Hacking Medicine from April 24th to 26th at the MIT Media Lab, the Grand Hack teams had just under 48 hours to pitch healthcare problems, form groups, prototype a solution, and develop a business model, before presenting their ideas to judges. Up for grabs were not only cash prizes that totalled more than $13,000, but also awards for teams to develop their ideas into startups through incubation and mentorship opportunities.

“With the collision of health, high tech, and value-based care, there really is no better time to create a healthcare start-up,” said Zen Chu, a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and one of the founders of MIT Hacking Medicine. “We’re excited to see teams from this weekend develop and launch their solutions.”

The weekend hackathon saw a turnout of over 450 participants from 19 states and eight countries – including participants from Canada, Ecuador, India, Mexico, Taiwan, Uganda, and Qatar – for a total of 80 teams across the four tracks. Now in its second year, the Grand Hack is MIT Hacking Medicine’s flagship event to innovate in healthcare by bringing the entire spectrum of healthcare stakeholders together in a hackathon.

“We were so excited to see the diversity of clinicians, engineers, developers, and designers, because we find that the best healthcare solutions come from the most diverse teams,” said Priya Garg, MIT mechanical engineering senior and MIT Hacking Medicine co-director. “A great example is the first prize winner of the Wearables track – Pillar, an oral contraceptive dispenser built into a smart bracelet that increased users’ medication adherence. The team consisted of a chemical biological engineer, a computer scientist, a management consultant, and an industrial designer.”

Health hackathons are being used by an increasingly wide range of organizations to solve tough healthcare problems and understand future business opportunities. Track sponsors for the Grand Hack include Massachusetts General Hospital’s Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech), GE Healthcare, Microsoft, and Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.

Lina Colucci, MIT Hacking Medicine’s other co-director and a PhD student in the MIT-Harvard Health Sciences and Technology program, said: “All of us have a stake in what the future of healthcare looks like because all of us will interface with the healthcare system at some point in our lives. Health hackathons like the Grand Hack bring diverse stakeholders under one roof and allow them to create that future together.”

For more information, please refer to Annexes A, B and C.

[1] Infinity Ultrasound, winner of the GE Ultrasound Grand Prize.

[2] Nyweza, winner of the CAMTech Global Health track first prize.

Related Resources

Annex A: Factsheet on winning teams
Annex B: Factsheet on the Grand Hack tracks
Annex C: Quotes From and Information on Gold sponsors

 

About MIT Hacking Medicine

The mission of MIT Hacking Medicine (MIT HackMed) is to energize the health ecosystem to solve some of healthcare’s biggest challenges by connecting the best and most diverse minds. Since holding the first ever health hackathon in 2010, the MIT student group has organized 37 health hackathons with more than 30 national and international organizations. More than 10 healthcare start-ups have emerged from MIT HackMed’s health hackathons. For more information, visit hackingmedicine.mit.edu.

 

Media Contact

Shirlene Liew
shirlene [at] mit [dot] edu

Health Hackathon Winners Provide A Window Into The Future Of Healthcare

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A mobile app that guides sonographers towards ideal ultrasound probe positioning [1],
and an easy-to-install device that enhances safety for the
predominantly women passengers of motorcycles in low and middle-income
countries [2].
These were just some of the innovative solutions that surfaced from the
Grand Hack health hackathon, where participants worked on healthcare
challenges within one of four tracks: global health, primary care,
telehealth enabled care pathways, and wearables.

Organized by MIT Hacking Medicine from April 24th to 26th
at the MIT Media Lab, the Grand Hack teams had just under 48 hours to
pitch healthcare problems, form groups, prototype a solution, and
develop a business model, before presenting their ideas to judges. Up
for grabs were not only cash prizes that totalled more than $13,000, but
also awards for teams to develop their ideas into startups through
incubation and mentorship opportunities.

“With the collision of health, high tech, and value-based care, there
really is no better time to create a healthcare start-up,” said Zen
Chu, a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and one of
the founders of MIT Hacking Medicine. “We’re excited to see teams from
this weekend develop and launch their solutions.”

The weekend hackathon saw a turnout of over 450 participants from 19
states and eight countries – including participants from Canada,
Ecuador, India, Mexico, Taiwan, Uganda, and Qatar – for a total of 80
teams across the four tracks. Now in its second year, the Grand Hack is
MIT Hacking Medicine’s flagship event to innovate in healthcare by
bringing the entire spectrum of healthcare stakeholders together in a
hackathon.

“We were so excited to see the diversity of clinicians, engineers,
developers, and designers, because we find that the best healthcare
solutions come from the most diverse teams,” said Priya Garg, MIT
mechanical engineering senior and MIT Hacking Medicine co-director. “A
great example is the first prize winner of the Wearables track – Pillar,
an oral contraceptive dispenser built into a smart bracelet that
increased users’ medication adherence. The team consisted of a chemical
biological engineer, a computer scientist, a management consultant, and
an industrial designer.”

Health hackathons are being used by an increasingly wide range of
organizations to solve tough healthcare problems and understand future
business opportunities. Track sponsors for the Grand Hack include
Massachusetts General Hospital’s Consortium for Affordable Medical
Technologies (CAMTech), GE Healthcare, Microsoft, and Merck KGaA,
Darmstadt, Germany.

Lina Colucci, MIT Hacking Medicine’s other co-director and a PhD
student in the MIT-Harvard Health Sciences and Technology program, said:
“All of us have a stake in what the future of healthcare looks like
because all of us will interface with the healthcare system at some
point in our lives. Health hackathons like the Grand Hack bring diverse
stakeholders under one roof and allow them to create that future
together.”

For more information, please refer to Annexes A, B and C.

[1] Infinity Ultrasound, winner of the GE Ultrasound Grand Prize.

[2] Nyweza, winner of the CAMTech Global Health track first prize.

Related Resources

Annex A: Factsheet on winning teams
Annex B: Factsheet on the Grand Hack tracks
Annex C: Quotes From and Information on Gold sponsors

About MIT Hacking Medicine

The mission of MIT Hacking Medicine (MIT HackMed) is to energize the
health ecosystem to solve some of healthcare’s biggest challenges by
connecting the best and most diverse minds. Since holding the first ever
health hackathon in 2010, the MIT student group has organized 37 health
hackathons with more than 30 national and international organizations.
More than 10 healthcare start-ups have emerged from MIT HackMed’s health
hackathons. For more information, visit hackingmedicine.mit.edu.

Regina wants your help to make doors more disability-friendly. What will you build this weekend?

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Diagnosed with four different cancers and a brain cyst since 2001, Regina Pontes says she’s lucky.
One cancer was discovered when Pontes, a singer, noted hoarseness in her voice. Another was revealed following a routine mammogram, which had worried doctors calling Pontes back in for more tests.
“I told them, “˜Now I know how Cindy Crawford feels,'” Pontes said. “Everyone always wants to take her picture.
Pontes’s upbeat attitude was tested following the removal of a large number of lymph nodes from her right side and ensuing severe bouts of cellulitis, which nearly forced the amputation of her right arm. Skin burns from the radiation kept her out of work longer than planned.
Not only that, but a brain tumor re-diagnosed as a cyst during surgery exploded, causing spinal fluid leaks and meningitis that nearly killed Pontes “” and a stroke in August 2011 left her in a wheelchair, without the use of her left hand.

Regina Pontes (here) is an amazing woman and has asked Grand Hack participants to hear her pitch on what she’d like you all to build this weekend… think “Open Sesame!” Check out Regina’s presentation and videos below to learn more why people with disabilities need doorways that are engineered better.

Regina has kindly volunteered her phone number for anyone who wants to call her this weekend and learn more about the challenges she faces.

(Talk to Lina from the MIT HackMed team this weekend to learn more.)

What will you build this weekend?

#GrandHack

Check out Regina’s presentation: Open Sesame!

Part 1 of the video:

 

Part 2 of the video:

 

(Photo from http://www.hertssecurity.com/automatic-door-openers/)